loading
Focus

 ←

→ 

Time
momentum
journal

Villa dei Misteri

Villa dei Misteri

share this room

condividi questa stanza

Until that moment in my life, peeing on the street had always gone well. I selected the right place, I pulled my jeans down and I liked the atmosphere of suspension whilst I was there, hastily squatting to listen to the faint sound of trickling while I looked into the darkness in front of me.  

I’ve always preferred peeing alone rather than in company because I’m able to preserve the moment better. Everyone knows that one of the greatest pleasures of women is going to the toilet together and, in the absence of a toilet, doing it together, laughing and passing each other the tissues.

This is something that I’ve never really understood. Sometimes I smile, but to myself. Anyway, it has always gone well. I’ve always managed to pull up my jeans just before a group of drunk boys or a bus full of tourists pass by.

Peeing on the street that friday was the first time it went badly. I was on my third hot beer, I wasn’t drunk. The public toilet was in the middle of the open space in which we were gathered, crammed on the cement structure where we smoked and drank beers that even though they had been put in the fridge, hadn’t been there long enough to get cold.  

The exhibition was installed inside a concrete skeleton, an unfinished house. A harsh and clear piece of land surrounded it, while a thick khaki bush had grown on its sides. In the middle, immediately in front of the house, clearly loomed the deep blue silhouette of the chemical toilet.  

Everyone would have seen me go. I might’ve had difficulty opening the door. Maybe even worse. So I crossed the crowd of people and the clearing and I came out onto a dark street, lined with cars. I walked a bit and I set myself up in the farthest point from the street lights.

Shortly after I had crouched down I saw an elegant black car turn the corner and drive down the street where I was hiding. I immediately turned my head away and remained still, waiting for it to pass. I didn’t want to give those in the car the satisfaction of seeing me quickly and embarrassedly pull up my pants. By the way, those jeans were high rise and a size too small, so I never would’ve been fast enough. I decided to stay there –  icy and arrogant – my head turned away, endlessly waiting for the car to pass by. But the car did not pass. It stopped directly behind me, with the headlights pointed at my body, and remained there, with the engine running.

I stood motionless, with my head turned away. Seconds passed. Then, as the car surprisingly still didn’t show any sign of moving and remained there with its engine running and the headlights pointed at me a, in the middle of the road. Given that it didn’t get in the way of the path, I decided that I could do nothing else but simply pull up my jeans and leave. I was faster than I thought and as I closed the zipper just above my navel, I was already near the entrance. After a few steps, I heard the car start. I didn’t look back.

Two glasses of beer later – drunk alone, leaning against the entrance gate – I decided to go inside and take a look at the exhibition. Luigi Ontani was climbing the concrete stairs in front of me (“they are already a work of art,” explained a boy with a beard, round glasses and red hair to his girlfriend who was dressed in a beige cotton dress – a sack.) Ontani was dressed in white, his grey hair impeccably tied back in a ponytail. I became emotional and I looked at him smiling, yet still distracted by the girl with the sack dress, who was almost as beautiful as the actress from the film L’amante – an adaption of a book by Marguerite Duras. Why was she with that red head who was ugly and half her height? While I turned to look at the couple, in an attempt to analyse the situation, Ontani stopped suddenly in order to let a blonde with a leopard print silk tunic pass, and I bumped into him, planting a slap on his back. Ontani turned around to look at me, then his gaze lowered to my red t-shirt, and he winced as if he recognised someone or something, and before turning around again and continuing to climb the stairs he winked at me.

I remembered passing a morning in london, in room 287C, Aisle House, Docklands Campus, looking at all of his works and interviews, eating cold leftover Indian food. Then the technician arrived to test the suitability of my electronic devices with the voltage of The University of East London. I continued eating rolls whilst standing and, Ontani, in the video, continued speaking. Crouched in front of the power outlet, the technician seemed not to notice my odd breakfast, Ontani speaking in Italian, standing behind him – watching the video even though I couldn’t focus on it anymore as I was now terrorised by the prospect of having to have a conversation in English.

Seeing the elegant Ontani in real life filled me with joy. “There’s Luigi Ontani, did you see him?” I said a little while later to a guy with round glasses, a tattoo on his neck and a long beard. And he replied with disdain: “Of course, he’s always around, at all the openings, small or large. He never fails.” I wondered what Luigi Ontani thought of us. Why did he go to all the openings? I wanted to ask him what he thought of the concrete stairs that were already an artwork, but I’ve never been able to approach those who I respect. In such moments, fear always paralyses me.

For example, two days earlier at HM on Via del Corso, I’d seen Elisabetta Rocchetti – the actress from L’imbalsamatore by Matteo Garrone. She was looking at jeans for 19,90. I heard her attacking the sales assistant: “Where are these jeans at 19,90?” The sales assistant replied: “They’re upstairs, on the first floor.” She said, “Oh yeah? Your colleague made me come down. Coordinate yourselves better.” Then she bothered another sales assistant to ask for advice on her size. “The smallest!” Exclaimed the sales assistant, staring at her withered legs. She was just like in the movie: pale, with a soft nose, as if made of fresh clay, cross-eyed and wavy dark hair framing her face. I wandered around the room, trembling, thinking about how to approach her. What could I ask her could her? An autograph? A selfie?

The only autograph that I’ve ever really wanted in my life is Minnie’s and, when I was twelve. I was at Disneyland in Paris. I searched for Minnie all week and I never found her. I got an autograph from Pluto, which I didn’t give a damn about and gave to my brother straight away. While we waited for the bus to the airport, Minnie suddenly appeared. I pretended not to see her, paralysed by fear. My mother pointed her out to me. “I saw her, mum, I saw her!” The children crowded around Minnie but I couldn’t move. “Why don’t you go to her?” My mother asked gently. Wasn’t it something I had wanted to do for the whole week? What could Minnie do to me? I didn’t know how to respond. Eventually my mum went and spoke at length with Minnie, whose signature – beautiful and, in italics – horizontally occupied a full page of my diary. Minnie, and the dot on the "i" was shaped like a heart.  

“I'm not a frightened child anymore,” I repeated to myself as I wandered randomly around the HM in Via Del Corso. I would’ve spoken with Elisabetta Rocchetti. I would have told her that she was beautiful, that her performance in Garrone’s film was unforgettable. While I was planning my approach I decided to try on a basic black miniskirt marked at 4,90 as well as a blue skirt with white flowers, marked at 14,90. I decided that the blue skirt was too expensive and that the black one was too short. It took me a while to convince myself. When I came out of the dressing room she was there, Elisabetta Rocchetti, and she set upon me: “Are you done?” “Yes!” I exclaimed firmly, and dashed for the stairs.

 

Having spotted Luigi Ontani and speaking with the tattooed guy with a long beard, I was confronted by an extremely short boy with round glasses and a beard. His work, he told me, was a fountain (i.e. a tube that sprayed water) built into a corner of the basement of the building-site. Suddenly the short boy left and, in his place, his girlfriend appeared, who said she had a Project Space in Vienna and before going away she encouraged me to go visit her one day: she would host me at her place. She seemed much older than the short guy, but more beautiful, with gray eyes surrounded by little wrinkles and a beige trench coat.

Then I spoke to a girl who would have worn at least a size 6 bra and who was a curator in Berlin. Her boyfriend, who stood next to her, and wore round glasses and had a long beard, was a German artist. While listening to her talk about Berlin and the imminent transfer of the couple to Los Angeles, I forced myself to think that I preferred to be just as I was, that is, peeing in front of people and doing a shitty job and writing naïve bullshit, rather than having two heavy tits to carry around and a boyfriend with round glasses and a long beard.

Then the very short guy and the tattooed guy began to talk about Pynchon and his latest book. “Have you read it?” They asked each other. They asked me too. Pynchon, Pynchon. I had only heard of it. I knew nothing about his latest book. I hesitated. “Yes, I've read it, but not ...". My indecision made them suspicious and so they continued to talk to each other. “It’s complex, very difficult, but worth it,” they said. Pynchon. Pynchon, Pynchon, I heard repeated by the two while I stared at them without really listening anymore.

The conversation with the curator died out at the moment when she asked me what I did and I told her the truth. And so, with the excuse of having to find a friend, she hastily walked away. I crossed the yard again. I wanted to reach a kind of black cabin with a transparent dome on top of it that I hadn’t seen yet and to close myself inside it for a few minutes.

But the cabin was occupied. Nearby, there was a lawn that gradually became more wild, then turning into a tangled bush a few more metres ahead. I felt something strange calling me and I took a few steps on the dry grass. Close to the first bushes, in an area that was mysteriously isolated from the construction overflowing with people, sounds reverberated in the air. A guy with a worn face, evidently the artist, began to tell me about the sound work with a slightly uncertain voice. The only thing I understood was Kepler and something about the planets. My favorite poem by Sylvia Plath came to mind, but I could only remember the beginning, not even the title:

This is the light of the mind, cold and planetary

That set of sounds, heard on that patch of dry grass, seemed able to get me closer to a kind of music of the mind. But a blonde I had spoken to a little while earlier started yelling out to me, already remembering my name (I had never understood hers) and warmly inviting me to enter the black cylinder. One sat there inside, assaulted by one of those white/black lights that slow down gestures. “Fantastic, don’t you think!” said the blonde, who had been waiting for me outside.

I had come alone, to see the exhibition and hoping to meet somebody new. I had seen the show and met someone. I could go. There was only one obstacle: to get to my house, on the opposite side of the city. The blonde had told me that she would take a taxi along with other two, and that if I wanted I could join them. For half an hour she had been saying that she wanted to go and drink somewhere else, but she didn't move and kept talking and inviting people to enter the black cylinder, which turned out to be her work.

Embarrassed and not knowing what to do or who to talk to, I had smoked at least nineteen cigarettes. I selected the name of my boyfriend in the address book of my phone but I didn’t call him. I wanted to pretend to talk to him, simulating a phone call in order to appear as though I was doing something while I waited for the blonde. But in the end I said “hello” too loudly and then I couldn’t go on. I held the phone to my for a few minutes, as if you I was listening. Then I dropped it back into my bag and went to call the taxi outside on the bare and gloomy Aurelia Antica.

The taxi was a big jeep with leather seats. I pressed myself up against the window; the driver was silent. Outside, Rome flowed by: elusive, with a beauty so vast and disjointed that it left me completely indifferent and therefore uncomfortable. Pine trees, illuminated by street lamps, drew dark curves on the ochre surfaces of the gigantic rudimentary buildings in the suburbs. Lofty palm trees swayed in the fragrant air. The streets were bare. The sky was dark yet in a strange sort of way, it seemed impenetrable, as if it were made of mists and nebulae: purple and reddish.

I did what I always do when I go home on the bus or metro (I never take a taxi): an evaluation of the day. At work everything had gone as usual, but that night there had been two signs:

- Sign no. 1: before going to the opening. Hungry, I walk into a takeaway pizza place, and say to the Moroccan guy that I’ll have a slice of plain pizza and a Ceres. With a discouraged air about him, he takes the top off the beer and puts the slice of pizza in the oven. 6 euro and 90, he says. I realise that other than a prepaid card, I only have a few coins which are not enough to pay. I count the coins: 3 euros and 10 all up. Embarrassed, I ask him if I can pay by card. He says no. I ask where I can withdraw. He says, “there,” pointing with his hand and then, listless, while I remain standing there with the focaccia and beer, he says: “well…at least eat.” But I can’t sit down, I'm too agitated, so I leave. The ATM is not “there,” but much further away. However, it is one of those ATMs that are inside, accessed by swiping a bank card, and mine never opens the door. I look for another. After half an hour I find one, but it doesn’t accept my card. I'm tired. I feel lonely. I want to cry. Where the fuck can I find another ATM? I take the the escalator down to the metro without looking back.

Back in highschool, I used to steal quite often. Once, just after I’d turned eighteen, they caught me and took me to the police station in one of their cars. They interrogated me and took fingerprints. I had stolen lipsticks and mascara from Upim to the value of around one hundred euro.

For a while I didn’t steal; and that evening, not taking the money to the unpleasant Moroccan guy seemed like an absurd gesture. I had to take it. Not doing it cast through a bitter and disturbing greenish light on everything I was going through in that period.

- Sign no. 2: the piss.

Whilst in the taxi I remembered when, in 2011, I promised my classmates a performance that was supposed to consist in going to the Venice Biennale, whose Italian pavilion would be curated by Sgarbi that year and, wandering the halls, pee myself, as a signal of dismay when faced with the ugliness of the selected works and the way in which Sgarbi had chose them and the fact that the pavilion had been assigned to him. In short, a gesture of protest.

“We will have to drink a lot of beer,” I said and, already drunk, surprised by the early evenings of spring, I encouraged my friends to imagine the scene. The spreading stain on our pants, the liquid that slowly dripped on the floor, the footsteps that we would have left. Would they notice during or after? Would they have ordered us to leave or simply ignored it? Maybe they would call the police. Still drunk, we conspired: “But we say to the police that we didn’t do it on purpose, that urinating is a uncontrollable physiological act, that we don’t even know each other. We felt a sense of fear for the future of art and we couldn’t do anything to stop ourselves.”

I didn’t gain widespread support, I didn’t know the rest, and three trusted friends, maybe two, were willing to accompany me. When the Biennale began I invented an excuse for not doing it – that I didn’t want to pay for the train ticket, let alone the entrance and, that shit deserved neither the attention nor the money, not to mention the performance.

Several years had passed since the idea of pissing against Sgarbi. I was no longer a naïve and easily enthused student. Now, I was just a hostess. And yet, I still knew how to get angry. This time though, it was different – inadequate, strange, hopelessly excluded and now, out of the game. In addition to the stupid hurry to get there in time, I had robbed the unpleasant Pizza al taglio guy. And I was going to spend a shameful amount of money on taxis. I had peed in front of the black car, in which, it was highly probable that Luigi Ontani had been. Protected by the majesty of the jeep with leather seats, I was unhappy but full of hope, and I seemed to understand, in depth, that everything that had happened had a morality, a conclusion. It was my job to solve this equation. But maybe it was an indeterminate or impossible equation.

And just as I was racking my brains to simplify, divide and get a result, two other signs arrived, making my calculations even more complicated. Two songs – both important for me, one after another – served as the background to my trip.

- Tiromancino, Due destini (Two destinies): at home, alone, at thirteen, I listened to it in loop, painting pictures in oil that resembled Beckett’s desolate landscapes. In fact, at that time, my favourite book was Waiting for Godot. Why was I so sad? I try to remember, but I can’t. What were Luigi Ontani, the really short boy, the tattooed guy, the fat girl and the blonde doing at thirteen?

- Alicia Keys, No one: I listened to it on the train, on my way to visit my ex-boyfriend, in prison for armed robbery. It was the first time I went to see him and at the time, I couldn’t have known – that it would be my only visit. I cried on the empty train while the voice of Alicia Keys drilled in my ears. I was twenty. What were Luigi Ontani, the really short boy, the tattooed guy, the fat girl and the blonde doing at twenty?

Escaping from the attempt to solve the equation, an artwork by Alberto Garutti came to mind: Tutti i passi che ho fatto nella mia vita mi hanno portato qui, ora. (All the steps I have taken in my life have led me here, now.) A phrase engraved on the floor of the Milan Malpensa airport. Remembering it in that moment meant to me that no matter how slippery and discomforting the result was, now I was in a taxi with leather seats and this was the only thing I wanted and I could know about me and life.

After work, the next day, I withdrew and walked to Termini. I went to Pizza al Taglio and saw a tall Italian man behind the counter with white hair. The unpleasant boy came out of the kitchen. From the way he looked at me it seemed that he didn’t remember me at all. I thought that he had spent the evening waiting for me to come. I thought that he’d interpreted my little scene as a plan to get a free meal at his expense; and I thought that my actions could’ve been the tip of the iceberg; the story to tell when he explained why he had lost the little confidence he had left in people.

I thought that he was imagining: “Everything is uncomfortable, dirty, greasy and difficult. I'm tired and women don’t look at me, my wife is sick of me and she’s pregnant, and this girl here with almost black lipstick that makes her more scary than ugly, is staging this ridiculous scene to steal 6,90 euro. But what’s the point? The situation looks set to worsen or at best to remain as it is. How will my life ever get better?”

But instead, he looked at me bewildered. Maybe he was afraid that his boss would scold him because he had allowed such a thing to happen, and so he was pretending not to remember. But now I was there, with the money in my hand, and after a moment of panic in which I remained staring at him paralysed, I chucked the 10 euro banknote down on the counter and quickly dashed out of the store.

Nella mia vita, fino a quel momento, le pisciate per strada erano sempre andate bene. Sceglievo il posto giusto, calavo i jeans e mi piaceva l'atmosfera sospesa di quando ero lì, accovacciata in un frettoloso raccoglimento, ad ascoltare quel piccolo rumore di torrente e fissare nell'oscurità davanti a me.

Per proteggere quei momenti ho sempre preferito pisciare da sola che in compagnia. Si sa che una delle grandi passioni delle donne è andare al cesso insieme e, in mancanza di cesso, farla insieme, ridendo e passandosi i fazzoletti.

Non ho mai capito questa passione. A volte ho riso, ma da sola. E comunque mi è sempre andata bene, ogni volta mi sono tirata su i jeans proprio un secondo prima che passasse un gruppo di ragazzi ubriachi o un pullman carico di turisti.

La pisciata per strada di quel venerdì fu la prima ad andare male. Ero alla terza birra calda, non ero ubriaca. Il cesso chimico era nel mezzo dello spiazzo che noi tutti sovrastavamo, accalcati sulla struttura di cemento a fumare e bere birre che erano state messe in frigo ma non avevano avuto il tempo di raffreddarsi. Ognuno si aggrappava alla sua come alla promessa di sentirsi a proprio agio, prima o poi. Tutti trangugiavano con avidità.

La mostra era allestita all’interno di uno scheletro di cemento, una villetta rimasta incompiuta. Intorno si estendeva uno spazio di terra aspra e chiara, mentre ai lati era cresciuta una fitta boscaglia color kaki. In mezzo, proprio davanti alla casa, si ergeva nitida la sagoma azzurro carico del cesso chimico.

Tutti mi avrebbero visto andarci. Magari avrei avuto delle difficoltà ad aprire la porta. Magari sarebbe successo di peggio. Così attraversai il grumo di persone, lo spiazzo e sbucai in una stradina oscura, con file di macchine da una parte e dall'altra. Camminai un po' e mi sistemai nel punto più lontano dalle luci dei lampioni.

Poco dopo essermi rannicchiata vidi un’elegante macchina nera svoltare l'angolo e introdursi nella strada dove mi ero nascosta. Subito girai la testa dall'altra parte e rimasi ferma nell'attesa che passasse. Non volevo dare a quelli nella macchina la soddisfazione di vedermi tirare su i pantaloni rapida e imbarazzata. Tra l’altro quei jeans erano a vita alta e di una taglia in meno, quindi non sarei mai riuscita ad essere veloce. Perciò decisi di rimanere lì, algida e superba, con la testa voltata dall'altra parte, nell'attesa infinita dell’istante in cui la macchina sarebbe passata, superandomi. Ma la macchina non passò. Si fermò proprio dietro di me, con i fari puntati verso il mio corpo, e lì rimase, a motore acceso.

Io stavo immobile, tenendo la testa girata. Passarono tanti secondi. Poi, visto che la macchina sorprendentemente non si muoveva, e rimaneva lì, con i fari puntati verso di me e il motore acceso, nel mezzo della strada, proprio vicino a me, che di certo non intralciavo il passaggio, decisi che non potevo fare altro che tirare su i jeans e andarmene. Fui più veloce di quanto pensassi e mentre chiudevo la zip fin sopra all'ombelico ero già quasi vicino all'entrata. Dopo pochi passi sentii la macchina ripartire. Non mi voltai a guardare.

Due bicchieri di birra dopo - bevuti da sola, appoggiata al cancello dell’ingresso - decisi di entrare a guardare la mostra. Luigi Ontani, davanti a me, saliva le scale di cemento armato (“che sono già un'opera”, spiegava un ragazzo con barba, occhiali rotondi e capelli rossi alla fidanzata con vestito di cotone beige, a sacco). Ontani era vestito di bianco, i capelli grigi impeccabilmente legati in una crocchia. Ero emozionata e lo guardavo sorridendo, ma mi distraevo tenendo d'occhio anche la trasandata col vestito a sacco, così bella da sembrare l'attrice del film L'amante, quello tratto dal libro di Marguerite Duras. Perché stava con quel rosso di barba e capelli, che era brutto e alto la metà di lei? Mentre mi giravo per guardare la coppia, nel tentativo di analizzare la situazione, Ontani si fermò improvvisamente per far passare una ragazza bionda con casacca di seta leopardata, e io gli andai addosso, piantandogli una manata nella schiena. Ontani si girò a guardarmi, poi abbassò lo sguardo sulla mia maglietta rossa, sussultò come se riconoscesse qualcuno o qualcosa, e prima di voltarsi e continuare a salire ridacchiò di gusto e mi fece l’occhiolino.

Mi ricordai di una mattinata a Londra, nella stanza 287 C, Aisle House, Docklands Campus, passata a guardare tutte le sue opere e le sue interviste mangiando cibo indiano freddo di frigorifero. Poi era arrivato il tecnico a testare l'idoneità dei miei electronic devices al voltaggio della corrente della University of East London. Io avevo continuato a mangiare gli involtini, in piedi, e Ontani, nel video, continuava a parlare. Il tecnico, accucciato davanti alla presa della corrente, sembrava non far caso alla mia strana colazione, alle parole in italiano di Ontani e a me che, in piedi dietro di lui, continuavo a guardare il video nonostante non riuscissi più ad ascoltarlo, frastornata dal terrore di dover intraprendere una conversazione in inglese.

Vedere Ontani reale ed elegantissimo davanti a me mi riempiva di gioia. “C'è Luigi Ontani, hai visto?”, dissi poco dopo a un tizio con gli occhiali rotondi, un tatuaggio sul collo e una lunga barba. E lui, con sufficienza: “Ma sì, c'è sempre, a tutte le inaugurazioni, piccole o grandi. Lui non manca mai”. Chissà cosa pensava di noi Luigi Ontani. Perché andava a tutte le inaugurazioni? Avrei voluto chiedergli un parere sulle scale di cemento che erano già un’opera, ma non sono mai stata capace di approcciare chi stimo. In momenti simili, la paura mi paralizza.

Due giorni prima, ad esempio, all'HM di Via del Corso, avevo incontrato Elisabetta Rocchetti, l'attrice di L'imbalsamatore di Matteo Garrone. Cercava dei jeans a 19,90. L’avevo sentita aggredire il commesso: “Dove sono 'sti jeans a 19,90?”. Il commesso: “Sono su, al primo piano”. E lei: “Ah si? La tua collega m'ha fatto scendere. Metteteve d'accordo.” Poi aveva importunato un'altra commessa per chiederle un consiglio di taglia. “La più piccola!” aveva esclamato la commessa, fissando le sue gambe rinsecchite. Era proprio come nel film. Pallida, il naso molle, come fatto di creta fresca, gli occhi storti e bistrati, i capelli ondulati e scuri ai lati del viso. Giravo tremando per l'HM, pensando a come avvicinarla. Cosa potevo chiederle? Un autografo? Un selfie?

L'unico autografo che ho desiderato nella mia vita è quello di Minnie, quando avevo dodici anni. Ero a Disneyland Paris. Avevo cercato Minnie per tutta la settimana e non l'avevo mai trovata. Mi ero fatta fare un autografo da Pluto, di cui non me ne fregava un cazzo e che infatti avevo subito regalato a mio fratello. Mentre aspettavamo il pullman per l'aeroporto, ecco comparire Minnie. Io facevo finta di non vederla, paralizzata dalla paura. Mia madre mi segnalò la sua presenza. “L’ho vista, mamma, l’ho vista!”. I bambini si accalcavano attorno a Minnie ma io non riuscivo a muovermi. “Perché non vai da lei?” chiedeva mia madre con dolcezza. Non era forse una cosa che desideravo fare da tutta la settimana? Che poteva farmi Minnie di male? Io non sapevo rispondere. Alla fine ci andò lei, mia madre, e parlò a lungo con Minnie, la cui firma, bellissima, in corsivo, occupò una pagina intera, in orizzontale, del mio diario. Minnie, e sulla “i” il puntino era a forma di cuore.

“Non sono più una bambina impaurita”, mi ripetevo vagando a caso per l’HM di Via Del Corso. Avrei parlato con Elisabetta Rocchetti. Prima le avrei detto che era bellissima, poi che la sua interpretazione nel film di Garrone era stata indimenticabile. Mentre progettavo il mio approccio decisi di provare una minigonna nera della linea basic, prezzo 4,90 e una gonna blu con fiorellini bianchi, prezzo 14,90. Decisi che la gonna blu era troppo costosa e quella nera troppo corta. Ci misi un po' a convincermi. Quando uscii dal camerino c'era proprio lei, Elisabetta Rocchetti, che mi aggredì dicendo: “Hai finito sì?” “Sì!”, esclamai io con decisione, e scappai giù per le scale, correndo.

Dopo aver avvistato Luigi Ontani e averne parlato con il ragazzo tatuato con la lunga barba, mi trovai di fronte un ragazzo estremamente basso con occhiali rotondi e barba. La sua opera, mi raccontò, era una fontana (cioè un tubo che spruzzava acqua) costruita in un angolo del seminterrato del palazzo-cantiere. Ad un tratto il bassissimo andò via e al suo posto arrivò la sua fidanzata, che diceva che aveva un Project Space a Vienna e prima di andarsene mi incoraggiò ad andare a trovarla, un giorno: mi avrebbe ospitato a casa sua. Sembrava molto più vecchia del bassissimo, ma molto più bella, con occhi grigi circondati da piccole rughe e un trench beige.

Poi parlai con una che avrà avuto una sesta di seno e faceva la curatrice a Berlino. Il suo fidanzato, lì di fianco a lei, con occhiali tondi e una lunga barba, era un artista tedesco. Mentre la ascoltavo parlare di Berlino e e dell’imminente trasferimento della coppia a Los Angeles, mi sforzai di pensare che preferivo essere com'ero, e cioè pisciare davanti alla gente e fare un lavoro di merda e scrivere stronzate naïf, piuttosto che avere due pesantissime tette da portare in giro e un fidanzato con occhiali tondi e una lunga barba.

Poi il bassissimo e il tatuato si misero a parlare di Pynchon e del suo ultimo libro. “L'hai letto?” Si dicevano a vicenda. Lo chiesero anche a me. Pynchon, Pynchon. L'avevo soltanto sentito nominare. Non sapevo nulla del suo ultimo libro. Tentennai. “Si l'ho letto, ma non ...”. La mia indecisione li insospettì e continuarono a parlare tra loro. “È complesso, davvero difficile, ma vale la pena”, dicevano. Pynchon. Pynchon, Pynchon, sentivo ripetere a quei due mentre li fissavo senza più sentirli.

La conversazione con la curatrice si estinse nel momento in cui lei mi chiese di cosa mi occupavo e io dissi la verità. Così lei, con la scusa di cercare un'amica perduta, si allontanò con una certa fretta. Io attraversai di nuovo lo spiazzo, volevo raggiungere una specie di cabina nera con in cima una cupola trasparente che non avevo ancora visitato e chiudermi per qualche minuto lì dentro.

La cabina però era occupata. Lì vicino c'era un prato che man mano si faceva più selvaggio, trasformandosi, pochi metri avanti, in un'intricata boscaglia. Feci qualche passo sull'erba secca. Vicino ai primi arbusti, in un'area di un metro quadrato che rimaneva misteriosamente isolata dallo spiazzo e dalla costruzione di cemento traboccante di gente, l'aria emetteva dei suoni. Uno con la faccia sciupata, evidentemente l’artista, si avvicinò a me e iniziò a raccontarmi l'opera sonora con una voce un po’ insicura. Mi piaceva ascoltarlo parlare di Keplero e pianeti e mentre parlava mi venne in mente una poesia di Sylvia Plath, quella che inizia con:

This is the light of the mind, cold and planetary

Ma una bionda con cui avevo parlato poco prima iniziò a chiamarmi gridando, ricordandosi già il mio nome (io non avevo mai capito il suo) ed invitandomi calorosamente ad entrare nel cilindro nero. Lì dentro ci si sedeva, aggrediti da una luce bianca/nera di quelle che rallentano i gesti. “Fantastico, no?”, disse la bionda, che mi aveva aspettato fuori.

Ero venuta da sola, per vedere la mostra e conoscere qualcuno. Avevo visto la mostra e conosciuto qualcuno. Potevo andare. C'era solo un ostacolo: raggiungere la mia casa, dalla parte opposta della città. La bionda mi aveva detto che avrebbe preso un taxi insieme ad altre due e che se volevo potevo aggiungermi a loro. Da mezz'ora diceva che voleva andare a bere altrove, ma non si schiodava e continuava a parlare e a invitare la gente ad entrare nel cilindro nero, che avevo scoperto essere opera sua.

Per l'imbarazzo di non sapere cosa fare e con chi parlare, avevo fumato almeno diciannove sigarette. Selezionai nella rubrica il nome del mio fidanzato ma non lo chiamai. Volevo fingere di parlare con lui, simulare una telefonata, così avrei avuto la parvenza di essere qualcuno che sta facendo qualcosa e intanto avrei aspettato la bionda. Invece dissi solo “ciao” a voce troppo alta e poi non riuscii ad andare avanti. Tenni il cellulare vicino all'orecchio per alcuni minuti, come se stessi ascoltando. Poi lo ributtai nella borsa e andai a chiamare il taxi fuori sull'Aurelia Antica spoglia e tenebrosa.

Il taxi era una grande jeep con i sedili in pelle. Mi schiacciai addosso al finestrino, l’autista era silenzioso. Fuori, Roma scorreva, inafferrabile, con una bellezza così vasta e disarticolata da lasciarmi del tutto indifferente e quindi a disagio. I pini marittimi, illuminati dai lampioni, disegnavano curve oscure sull'ocra dei palazzi rudimentali e giganteschi della periferia. Le palme, altissime, ciondolavano nell'aria profumata. Le strade erano vuote. Il cielo era buio in un modo strano, aveva un'oscurità densa, come fatta di nebbie e nebulose, viola e rossastre.

Feci quello che faccio sempre quando torno a casa in autobus o in metro (in taxi non torno mai): un bilancio della giornata. Al lavoro era stato tutto come al solito, ma quella sera c'erano stati due segni:

- Segno n. 1: prima di andare all’inaugurazione. Affamata, entro in una pizzeria al trancio e dico al ragazzo marocchino che prendo una pizza bianca e una Ceres. Lui stappa la birra e inforna la pizza con un’aria sconfortata. 6 euro e 90, dice. Mi accorgo che, oltre alla carta prepagata, ho solo poche monete che non bastano per pagare. Le conto: 3 euro e 10 in tutto. Gli chiedo imbarazzata se posso pagare con la carta, lui risponde di no. Gli chiedo dove posso prelevare, lui dice: “là”, indicando con la mano e poi, svogliato, mentre io rimango in piedi con focaccia e birra, dice: “ormai … mangia”. Però io non riesco a sedermi, sono troppo agitata e quindi me ne vado. Il bancomat non è affatto “là”, ma molto dopo. Comunque è uno di quelli interni, ai quali si accede infilando la carta, e la mia non fa mai aprire la porta. Ne cerco un altro. Dopo mezz’ora lo trovo, ma non accetta la mia carta. Sono stanca. Mi sento sola. Vorrei piangere. Dove cazzo trovare un altro bancomat? Scendo le scale mobili verso la metro senza guardare indietro.

Al liceo rubavo abbastanza spesso. Una volta, avevo appena compiuto diciotto anni, mi beccarono e mi portarono in questura con la volante. Mi interrogarono, mi presero le impronte digitali e dissero che ero “indagata a piede libero”. Avevo rubato rossetti e mascara alla Upim per un valore di un centinaio di euro.

Da tempo non rubavo più, e quella sera non riportare i soldi al marocchino antipatico mi sembrava un gesto assurdo. Dovevo per forza restituirglieli. Non farlo gettava su tutto quello che stavo vivendo una luce amara e inquietante, verdastra.

- Segno n. 2: la pisciata.

Sul taxi mi tornò in mente quando, nel 2011, avevo promosso ai miei compagni di corso una performance che sarebbe dovuta consistere nell'andare alla Biennale di Venezia, il cui padiglione Italia sarebbe stato quell'anno organizzato da Sgarbi e, girando per le sale, pisciarsi addosso, come segnale di sgomento per la bruttezza delle opere scelte e per il modo con cui lui le aveva scelte e per il fatto che la cura del padiglione fosse stata a lui assegnata. Un gesto di protesta insomma.

“Dovremo bere molta birra”, dicevo e, già ubriaca, sorpresa dalle prime serate di primavera, invitavo i miei amici ad immaginare la scena. La macchia sui pantaloni che si espandeva, il liquido che lentamente gocciolava sul pavimento, le orme che avremmo lasciato. Se ne sarebbero accorti durante o dopo? Ci avrebbero intimato di andarcene o avrebbero fatto finta di niente? Forse avrebbero chiamato la polizia. Sempre ubriachi, cospiravamo: “Ma noi alla polizia diciamo che non abbiamo fatto apposta, che urinare è un atto fisiologico irrefrenabile, che tra di noi non ci conosciamo nemmeno. Abbiamo percepito una sensazione di paura per il futuro dell'arte e non abbiamo potuto fare nulla per trattenerci.”

Non raccolsi molte adesioni, del resto non conoscevo nessuno, ma tre amici fidati, forse due, si dissero pronti ad accompagnarmi. Quando la Biennale iniziò ad essere visitabile inventai, come scusa per non farlo, che non volevo pagare il biglietto del treno e tanto meno quello d'ingresso, che quella merda non meritava né attenzione né soldi e tantomeno una performance.

Erano passati diversi anni dall’idea della pisciata contro Sgarbi. Non ero più un’ingenua studentessa dai facili entusiasmi. Adesso, ero soltanto una hostess. Eppure sapevo ancora arrabbiarmi. Questa volta, però, era diverso, perché il mio disagio viaggiava in senso opposto: mi sentivo inadeguata, strana, irrimediabilmente esclusa, ormai fuori dai giochi. In più per la stupida fretta di arrivare in tempo avevo derubato l'antipatico di Pizza al taglio. E stavo per spendere una vergognosa quantità di soldi in taxi. Avevo pisciato davanti alla macchina nera, però, sulla quale, molto probabilmente, viaggiava Luigi Ontani. Protetta dalla maestosità della jeep con i sedili in pelle, ero infelice ma piena di speranza e mi sembrava di intuire, in profondità, che tutto quello che era successo aveva una morale, una conclusione. Era un'equazione che era mio compito risolvere. Ma forse era un'equazione indeterminata o impossibile.

E proprio mentre mi scervellavo per semplificare, dividere e ottenere un risultato, arrivarono altri due segni, a rendere i miei calcoli ancora più intricati. Due canzoni, entrambe importanti per me, una dopo l'altra, che fecero da sottofondo al mio viaggio.

- Tiromancino, Due destini: a casa, da sola, a tredici anni, l’ascoltavo in loop, dipingendo con i colori a olio paesaggi desolati che sembravano scenografie di Beckett. Il mio libro preferito, in effetti, a quei tempi, era Waiting for Godot. Perché ero così triste? Mi sforzo di ricordare, ma non riesco. Cosa facevano Luigi Ontani, il bassissimo, il tatuato, la grassa e la bionda a tredici anni.

- Alicia Keys, No one: l'ascoltavo sul treno, mentre andavo a trovare il mio fidanzato di allora, in prigione per rapina a mano armata. Era la prima volta che andavo da lui e - ancora non lo potevo sapere - sarebbe rimasta l'unica. Sul treno vuoto piangevo mentre la voce di Alicia Keys mi trapanava le orecchie. Avevo vent'anni. Cosa facevano Luigi Ontani, il bassissimo, il tatuato, la grassa e la bionda a vent'anni?

Mi venne in mente, come fuga dal tentativo di risolvere l'equazione, un'opera di Alberto Garutti: Tutti i passi che ho fatto nella mia vita mi hanno portato qui, ora. Una frase incisa sul pavimento dell’aeroporto Milano Malpensa. Ricordarla in quel momento significò per me che per quanto il risultato fosse scivoloso e inquietante io adesso ero su quel taxi con sedili in pelle e questa era l’unica cosa che volevo e potevo sapere di me e della vita.

Dopo il lavoro, il giorno seguente, prelevai e andai a Termini a piedi. Entrai da Pizza al taglio e vidi dietro al bancone un uomo alto, italiano, con i capelli bianchi. Dalla cucina sbucò il ragazzo antipatico. Da come mi guardò sembrava non si ricordasse affatto di me. Credevo avesse passato la serata ad aspettare che tornassi. Credevo avesse interpretato la mia scenetta come un piano per cenare gratis a sue spese e credevo che quel mio gesto potesse essere stato la goccia che aveva fatto traboccare il vaso, l'aneddoto da raccontare quando spiegava perché aveva perso la poca fiducia che gli era rimasta nei confronti della gente.

Credevo avesse pensato: “Tutto è scomodo, sporco, unto e difficile, sono stanco e le donne non mi guardano, mia moglie è più stanca di me e poi è incinta, e questa qui con un rossetto quasi nero che la rende spaventosa prima ancora che brutta, mette in scena questa dinamica ridicola per rubarmi 6 euro e 90. Ma che senso ha? La situazione sembra destinata a peggiorare o al massimo a mantenersi così com'è. Come potrà mai la mia vita migliorare?”

Invece no, mi guardò smarrito. Forse aveva paura che il capo lo sgridasse perché aveva permesso che succedesse una cosa simile e allora faceva finta di non ricordarsi. Ma ormai ero lì, con i soldi in mano, e dopo un primo momento di panico, in cui rimasi paralizzata a fissarlo, lanciai sul bancone una banconota da 10 euro e scappai fuori correndo.

In order to fully appreciate the quality of the following video, we invite you to turn your subwoofer on and play the video in fullscreen.
Per apprezzare appieno la qualità del seguente video, ti invitiamo ad accendere il subwoofer e mettere il lettore a schermo intero.
“The eyes of an animal when they consider a man are attentive and wary. The same animal may well look at other species in the same way. He does not reserve a special look for man. But by no other species except man will the animal’s look be recognized as familiar. Other animals are held by the look. Man becomes aware of himself returning the Look.
...

 

 

 

01

 

 

 

02
03

 

 

 

04
05

 

 

 

06

 

 

 

07

 

 

 

The animal scrutinizes him across the narrow abyss of non-comprehension.This is why the man can surprise the animal. Yet the animal – even if domesticated – can also surprise the man. The man too is looking across a similar, but not identical,abyss of non-comprehension. And this is so wherever he looks. He is always looking across ignorance and fear.”

 

 

 

08
09

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

11
12

 

 

 

13

"Quando sono intenti a esaminare un uomo, gli occhi di un animale sono vigili e diffidenti. Quel medesimo animale può benissimo guardare nello stesso modo un'altra specie. Non riserva uno sguardo speciale all'uomo. Ma nessun'altra specie, a eccezione dell'uomo, riconoscerà come familiare lo sguardo dell'animale. Gli altri animali vengono tenuti a distanza da quello sguardo. L'uomo diventa consapevole di se stesso nel ricambiarlo.
...

 

 

 

01

 

 

 

02
03

 

 

 

04
05

 

 

 

06

 

 

 

07

 

 

 

L'animale lo scruta attraverso uno stretto abisso di non-comprensione. Ecco perché l'uomo può sorprendere l'animale. Eppure anche l'animale - perfino se è domestico - può sorprendere l'uomo. Anche l'uomo guarda attraverso un simile, ma non identico abisso di non comprensione. Ed è così ovunque egli guardi. L'uomo guarda sempre attraverso la propria ignoranza e la propria paura"

 

 

 

08
09

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

11
12

 

 

 

13

These roughnesses are responsive to your touch: tap or mouse-over on them while you keep scrolling the contribution.
Queste ruvidità rispondono al tuo tocco. Cliccaci o passaci sopra con il mouse mentre scorri il contributo.
01a
02a
03a
04a
05a
06a
07a
08a
09a
10a
11a

01a
02a
03a
04a
05a
06a
07a
08a
09a
10a
11a

This audio track is supposed to be played while reading/looking at momentum. In some parts it is pretty intense, therefore we suggest you to lower your speakers a little bit.

 

Ci piacerebbe ascoltassi questa traccia audio mentre leggi/guardi momentum. Alcune parti sono un pò forti, perciò ti consigliamo di abbassare un poco il volume degli altoparlanti.

 

Villa di Livia

Villa di Livia

share this room

condividi questa stanza

I’m in a living room; or maybe I’m in a 1990s movie. The environment is gray and baby blue, with a reddish tinge from the light of a summer sunset filtering through the half-closed blinds. In the room there are three men: one in his fifties and two that are younger, about the same age as me. I observe them seated, or rather sunk into a sofa. The older man reminds me of a lawyer I was once introduced to: a guy of means, a guy who “invests.” Leaning against the door frame, he looks at me from behind his oval glasses and smiles like a clown. One of the two younger men is standing in the room. He’s a friend. I tried to set up a company with him some years ago but in the end he went solo. He’s a brilliant guy, a hustler, a certified asshole. Today he doesn’t look any different from how I knew him years ago – dopey, with a Brit-pop haircut and flushed cheeks. The other guy was my best friend when we were kids. He’s dressed in a pinstripe suit and sports a pair of sunglasses, perched on top of the sofa across from where I’m sitting. Now he’s a chemical engineer and we only ever see each other occasionally at the bar in the main square on Sundays, but as children we were very close, we built dozens and dozens of huts together. In the living room no one speaks, no one moves, no one even smokes. We could be making important decisions, or at least talk business, but it’s as if we’ve been crushed by a lifetime’s failures and are being forced to watch a continuous sunset…

Then I’m with my ex-best friend in the back of a luxury car. He’s still dressed in the pinstriped suit and sunglasses. We take a dirt road, but the car glides along smooth without the slightest jolt, as if we’re on a railway line. The landscape beyond the windows is arid and wild. The car stops near a hut. “This is where we sold the weapons,” my friend says. The hut is an assembly of corrugated sheets, Eternit and wooden boards – a bizarre house of cards, light years away from those precise buildings made of recycled materials we built as kids. An old lame man who I don’t recognise exits the hut. He says nothing and hands me an assault rifle. I grab the weapon, religiously, and then I wake up.

I’m in the office of my start-up company, a filthy room on the ground floor of the farmhouse where I store all the farming equipment. It used to be my grandfather’s office. And in fact, it’s still a mess of papers and things and smells. I’d burn everything if I could. But there’s always some unresolved issue. And so my father and I get down on our knees to rummage through all the shit, hoping to find another piece of that mosaic that is a life built on a fault line, spent putting together dilapidated properties and unstable lands, and half-broken things, and inconsistent human relationships… When my grandfather died, everything fell on us.

Inside the house, I found a table that wasn’t particularly noble but nevertheless well-made – out of solid wood and with refined legs. I cleaned and polished it. I threw the plank that was my grandfather’s “desk” into the back of the garage, and put my table at the centre of the office. Today I sit on a folding chair in the middle of all the shit, but at a nice table. I also have a laptop, a stack of Post-its and the Mont Blanc pen that was given to me at confirmation – a snazzy blue Mont Blanc.

My accountant told me about some phantom regional funds for young agricultural entrepreneurs. I wish I had never told my parents about it because it’s become another thing they nag me about. Breakfast, lunch, dinner: have you looked into the regional funds? Have you looked into the regional funds? The regional funds? The regional funds? Let’s check out these fucking regional funds! Google: r.e.g.i.o.n.a.l.f.u.n.d.s. Scrolling the announcements is a joke: “adoption of nanotechnologies;” “demolishing the workshop/market gap;” “development of space technology;” “open scheme of disruptive innovation” – “open scheme of disruptive innovation”? What do you even want to disrupt when everything here is already broken? I don’t know where to start to put the pieces together. I don’t know what to do with this land, with this house, with the emaciated and drooling strays that live outside its doors. I don’t know what to do with the fruit that grows on the trees and that in one way or another I have to collect, process, transform – into wine, into oil, into money, and again into earth, into plants.

I wonder whether a fund for reprogramming this cyclicality exists; to make sure it doesn’t become a spiral of fatigue and dissatisfaction, but rather a pattern that opens up, that moves forward… I need some air. I climb onto the roof of the house. It’s a bright morning, but the air is still fresh, and the coolness makes the landscape appear almost crunchy. I contemplate the countryside around the house; and then, further on – the highway, more countryside, the sea. The dogs stare up at me from the ground, panting. One begins to bark. “Shut up!” I yell; but he continues. “Shut the fuck up, I told you!” but he continues. Then, Jesus Christ, I take a tile and throw it at him.

I’m at the gym. I started a new intensive program called “Shortcut to Size,” because I want more muscles. The program was developed by an Italo-American bodybuilder with two hundred pseudo-PhDs – you get the app for free and then it fills up with ads of its protein drinks. The routine involves decreasing rep ranges but increasing weight each week. You do this for four weeks and then start over. In twelve weeks, you’re a champion and people on the street won’t even recognise you. In practice, it ensures that your muscles don’t get used to the same ratio of rep/weight and stagnate. If you keep them confused, they activate and grow.

A guy I’ve known since I was a kid is training in the room. We went to school together. He’s a farmer as well. But he actually bought the land which he works. His family didn’t have anything at the beginning. They worked like donkeys for others and now they have their own land, all for them. I respect them; they’re serious people who have serious goals in life.

The guy gets on the bench. He’s loaded the barbell at 30 and 30. He lies down, grips the barbell and centres it by sliding a few centimetres. Then he unlocks it from the support, slowly brings it to his chest, and pushes it up – and so on, for fifteen smooth repetitions. He’s like a machine – inhales, brings it down in two stages, exhales, pushes it up in one go. When he’s finished the set I ask if we can swap. I hold the same weight, I follow the same procedure: I lie down, centre, unlock, I go down, I go up. On the tenth repetition I have to close my eyes because I feel that my pupils are about to burst their sockets. The guy comes behind the bench and grabs the barbell. He says: “Give me two more.” I give them to him with all the strength that I can muster from my arms to my toes. On the twelfth repetition he grabs the barbell a second before it falls and rips my sternum. I get up from the bench and thank him. I need to throw up. I sit on the first piece of equipment that I find. As I see him loading another 5 kg on each side for another set, I think of that thing my father said about the guy’s family – he called it “the revenge of the sharecropper.”

I won a grant for my start-up. The fund was called “stimulating potential for innovation of SMEs for sustainable agriculture.” My project was to open a holiday farm. My father wanted to open a winery, but I did my accounting and a winery would have cost twice the amount of the prize – I’ve already put all of my money into this and I don’t want any debts. The holiday farm is perfect. I renovated the rooms on the top floor of the house, in two I even managed to put in a private bathroom. Downstairs, I cleaned up the kitchen, where I’ll have the reception and breakfast room. I then levelled the ground under the olive trees, maybe some hippy will want to pitch a tent there. I don’t want trailers though; they’re too much of a hassle. You have to build discharges, bring electricity, etc. And then there’s not even enough space. I should replace a part of the vineyard, but fuck that, there’s no way I’m doing that. Instead, if everything goes well, I’ll renovate the garage and put in two more rooms.

I’m with a photographer. He’s an acquaintance of my brother. I hired him because I need professional pictures of the house, inside and outside, for my website. The photographer seems like an alright guy, dressed cool in Nike runners and a baseball cap. His photos are beautiful – I mean, the house is beautiful, the countryside around it even more. You need balls to photograph the fucking dog. When he’s finished, we sit down at the office table to take a closer look at the photos on his computer. He tells me he’ll photoshop them over the next few days, that he’ll make them even more beautiful by bringing out the colours, and that people will think that it’s Greece.  

I take him to lunch at a restaurant by the sea. Then he says he wants to see the town. We go uptown. It’s stinking hot and there’s not a soul around. He sees that there are lots of houses for sale and asks me why. Why? Because no one wants to live in town any more. They all have mansions in the countryside. And they put their houses on the market hoping that British people will come and buy them. Wait and see... Some hovels caked with pigeon shit. Even the building in the main square is for sale – the entire thing. If you look at the façade you see windows in parts of the house covered by blinds and you can imagine that the family that lived there closing the house up bit by bit. Judging by the two well-placed windows, the last tenants probably only lived in one room. And now? Who knows, maybe they’re also in the countryside…

I take him back to the station so that he can catch the train back to where he came from. As I say goodbye, I tell him to email me the invoice and that I’ll transfer him the money. He replies, “Well, since I’m giving you a special rate, I thought we could maybe come to some sort of agreement…” “Ah… I hadn’t realised you’d want cash…” Where can I find a fucking ATM now? The station barely has two platforms. And then I can only withdraw 250 euro at a time… “Well, what should we do then?” “I mean, I don’t know what to do then.”

Sono in una stanza di soggiorno o forse sono in un film degli anni Novanta. L’ambiente è grigio e carta da zucchero, con una sfumatura rossastra prodotta dalla luce di un tramonto estivo che filtra attraverso delle veneziane semichiuse. Nella stanza ci sono tre personaggi, tre uomini; uno sulla cinquantina, gli altri due più giovani, forse miei coetanei. Li osservo seduto, anzi sprofondato in un divano. Nell’uomo sulla cinquantina riconosco un avvocato che mi è stato presentato qualche tempo fa, uno ricco, uno che “investe”. È appoggiato allo stipite di una porta e, dietro gli occhiali tondi, mi guarda con un sorriso da clown. In piedi nella stanza sta uno dei due uomini più giovani. È un amico, uno con cui in passato ho tentato di mettere in piedi una società, ma che alla fine si è messo in proprio, ché è un tipo brillante lui, un hustler, uno stronzo patentato. Ora però mi appare come quando l’avevo conosciuto , un ragazzone inebetito, con un taglio di capelli da cantante Britpop e le guance arrossate. L’ultimo è il mio migliore amico dell’infanzia. È seduto sulla spalliera del divano, sull’altra sponda rispetto a dove sono seduto io, e ha addosso un abito gessato e un paio di occhiali da sole. Oggi è un ingegnere chimico e ci vediamo raramente, ogni tanto la domenica, al bar in piazza; ma da bambini eravamo molto uniti, abbiamo costruito insieme decine e decine di capanni. Nella stanza di soggiorno nessuno parla, nessuno si muove, nessuno neanche fuma. Forse dovremmo prendere una decisione importante, o almeno discutere di un qualche affare; ma siamo come schiacciati dai fallimenti di una vita intera, forzati ad assistere a un tramonto continuo…

Poi sono con il mio ex-migliore amico nel retro di un’automobile lussuosa. Lui indossa sempre l’abito gessato e gli occhiali da sole. Percorriamo una strada sterrata, ma l’automobile sembra viaggiare su un binario, procede senza il minimo sobbalzo. Il paesaggio fuori dai finestrini è una campagna arida, incolta. L’automobile si ferma nei pressi di un capanno. “Qui è dove vendevamo le armi”, mi dice il mio amico. Il capanno è un assemblaggio di lamiere ondulate, eternit e tavole di legno – uno strampalato castello di carte, lontano anni luce dalle costruzioni tutte precisine che, se pur sempre con materiale di recupero, mettevamo in piedi noi da bambini. Dal capanno esce un uomo anziano, claudicante, che non riconosco. Non mi dice nulla e mi porge un fucile d’assalto. Afferro l’arma, religiosamente, e poi mi sveglio.

Sono nell’ufficio della mia piccola e media impresa – ovvero, una stanza lercia al piano terra della casa colonica nella quale ripongo tutti gli attrezzi agricoli. L’ufficio era prima di mio nonno. E infatti c’è ancora un macello di carte e di cose e di odori che neanche una stalla. Io brucerei tutto. Ma ogni tre per due salta fuori una questione irrisolta. E allora, con mio padre, ci mettiamo in ginocchio a frugare in tutta quella merda, nella speranza di trovare un’altra tessera di quel mosaico che è una vita costruita su una linea di faglia, spesa a mettere insieme proprietà fatiscenti, e terreni franosi, e cose mezze-rotte, e rapporti umani inconsistenti… Quando mio nonno è morto, a noi ci è crollato tutto addosso.

Nella casa ho trovato un tavolo bello, non particolarmente nobile, ma bello, di legno massello, con le gambe tornite. L’ho ripulito e lucidato. Ho scaraventato nel fondo del garage quel tavolo da sagra che faceva da “scrivania” e messo il mio al centro dell’ufficio. Adesso sono seduto in mezzo alla merda, su una sedia pieghevole, ma a un tavolo bello. Ho pure un computer, una pila di Post-it e la penna Mont Blanc che mi hanno regalato alla cresima – una Mont Blanc blu, una chiccheria.

La mia commercialista mi ha parlato di certi fantomatici fondi regionali per le giovani imprese agricole. Non l’avessi mai fatto a ridirlo a casa che è diventata un’altra cantilena. Colazione, pranzo, cena: hai guardato i fondi regionali? Hai guardato i fondi regionali? I fondi regionali? I fondi regionali? Eh guardiamo questi cazzo di fondi regionali! Google: f-o-n-d-i-r-e-g-i-o-n-a-l-i. A scrollare i bandi c’è da ridere: “adozione di nanotecnologie”; “abbattimento del divario laboratorio/mercato”; “sviluppo a livello di tecnologie spaziali”; “schema aperto di innovazione dirompente” – “schema aperto di innovazione dirompente”? E cosa vuoi dirompere che qua è tutto già rotto… Io non so da dove iniziare a rimettere insieme i pezzi. Non so cosa fare con questi terreni, con questa casa, con i cani randagi che stanno fuori dalla porta, tutti smagriti e bavosi. Non so cosa fare con i frutti che crescono sugli alberi e che in un modo o nell’altro devo raccogliere, processare, trasformare – in vino, in olio, in soldi, e nuovamente in terra, in piante.

Mi domando se esista un bando per riprogrammare questa ciclicità, per fare in modo che non diventi una spirale di fatica e d’insoddisfazione, ma un disegno che si apre, che rotola in avanti… Ho bisogno di aria. Salgo sul tetto della casa. È una mattina luminosissima, ma è ancora fresco, e quella frescura rende il paesaggio quasi croccante. Osservo la campagna intorno alla casa; e poi, più in là, l’autostrada, altra campagna, il mare. In basso i cani mi fissano, ansimando. Uno comincia ad abbaiare. “Zitto!” gli urlo; ma lui continua. “Stai zitto, ti ho detto!” ma lui continua ancora. Allora, porco Dio, prendo una tegola e gliela tiro addosso.

Sono in palestra. Ho iniziato un nuovo programma intensivo che si chiama “Shortcut to Size”, perché voglio mettere su muscoli più definiti. L’ha sviluppato un culturista italoamericano con duecento pseudo-dottorati – ti dà l’app gratis e poi te la riempie di pubblicità dei suoi beveroni proteici, lo svelto… Il programma consiste nel diminuire il numero di ripetizioni ma aumentare il peso ogni settimana. Fai così per quattro settimane e poi ricominci da capo. In dodici settimane sei un campione e la gente per strada non ti riconosce. In pratica, si tratta di fare in modo che i muscoli non si abituino allo stesso rapporto ripetizioni/peso e quindi ristagnino; mentre, se glielo sconvolgi, quelli vanno in palla, si attivano e crescono. Bum.

In sala, ad allenarsi, c’è anche questo tipo che conosco da quando ero ragazzino, veniva alla mia stessa scuola media. Fa il contadino pure lui. Solo che le terre che coltiva lui se le è comprate. Questi prima non c’avevano niente. Hanno lavorato una vita come asini nelle campagne degli altri e mo’ c’hanno una campagna pure loro, una tutta loro. Io li rispetto, gente seria, che punta agli obiettivi seri della vita.

Il tipo si mette sulla panca. Ha caricato il bilanciere: 30 e 30. Si stende, afferra la sbarra e la centra facendola scivolare di qualche centimetro. Sblocca quindi il bilanciere dall’appoggio, se lo porta al petto, lentamente, e lo spinge su – così, per quindici ripetizioni, pulitissime, pare una macchina. Scende in due tempi, inspirando, sale in uno, espirando. Quando ha finito il set gli chiedo se possiamo alternarci. Tengo lo stesso peso, seguo la stessa procedura: mi stendo, centro, sblocco, scendo, salgo. Alla decima ripetizione devo chiudere gli occhi perché mi sento che le pupille mi stanno per scoppiare fuori dalle orbite. Il tipo allora mi si mette dietro la panca e fa per afferrare il bilanciere. Mi dice: “Dammene altre due”. Gliele do, con tutta la forza che riesco a convogliare alle braccia dal più remoto dito dei piedi. Alla dodicesima ripetizione mi strappa dalle mani il bilanciare un secondo prima che mi precipiti e squarci lo sterno. Mi alzo dalla panca e lo ringrazio. Mi viene da vomitare, mi siedo sul primo attrezzo che trovo. Mentre lo guardo caricare altri 5 Kg per lato e apprestarsi a eseguire un’altro set, penso a quella volta che mio padre, commentando la vicenda della sua famiglia, l’aveva definita “la rivincita del mezzadro”.

Ho vinto un premio per la mia impresa agricola giovanile, per la mia start-up. Il bando a cui ho partecipato si chiamava “stimolare il potenziale di innovazione delle PMI per un’agricoltura sostenibile”. Il mio progetto è di aprire un agricampeggio. Mio padre voleva aprire una cantina, ma io i miei conti me li sono fatti e una cantina sarebbe costata due volte l’ammontare del premio – oh, sia chiaro che i miei soldi qui dentro ce li ho già buttati tutti e i debiti a vent’anni non li voglio. L’agricampeggio invece mi costa il giusto. Ho fatto ristrutturare le stanze al piano di sopra della casa, in due sono riuscito pure a infilarci il bagno privato. Al piano di sotto, ho ripulito la cucina, e lì ci faccio reception e colazioni. Ho poi spianato il terreno sotto gli ulivi, e là qualche fricchettone, se vuole, ci può pure stare in tenda. Le roulotte invece non le voglio, troppe noie: devi fare gli scarichi, portare l’elettricità ecc. E poi non c’è proprio spazio materiale; dovrei togliere un pezzo di vigna, ma non se ne parla. Più avanti, se mi va bene, piuttosto ristrutturo il garage e ci faccio uscire altre due stanze…

Sono con un fotografo. È uno che conosce mio fratello; ho chiesto a lui di consigliarmi qualcuno perché mi servono delle foto fatte bene della casa, interno ed esterno, per il sito web dell’agricampeggio. Il fotografo sembra un tipo OK, tutto vestito fichetto, con le Nike e il berretto da baseball. Le foto che fa sono belle – cioè, la casa è bella, la campagna intorno ancora di più; solo un coglione riuscirebbe a fotografarle alla cazzo di cane. Quando ha finito, le guardiamo meglio sul suo computer, sul tavolo dell’ufficio. Mi dice che ci mette mano con Photoshop nei prossimi giorni, che le fa diventare ancora più belle – tira fuori i colori, ancora di più, che la gente quando le vede pensa che è la Grecia.

Lo porto a pranzo in un ristorante alla marina. Poi mi dice che vuole vedere il paese. Risaliamo. C’è un caldo bestiale e in giro non c’è un’anima. Nota che ci sono tantissime case in vendita e mi chiede perché. Eh, perché? Perché in paese non ci vuole stare più nessuno. Tutti si sono fatti i casamenti in campagna, che tanto fanno i contadini. E le case in paese le mettono in vendita sperando che arrivino gli inglesi a comprarsele. Aspetta e spera… Certe catapecchie incrostate di merda di piccione che te le raccomando. Pure il palazzo in piazza è in vendita – tutto intero. Se osservi la facciata, dalla qualità delle tapparelle, capisci che ogni dieci anni la famiglia che ci viveva ne chiudeva un pezzo. Gli ultimi anni, a giudicare dalle quelle due sole finestre ben messe, vivevano in una stanza. E adesso? Boh, forse pure loro in campagna…

Lo riporto giù, alla stazione, che riprende il treno per tornarsene da dove è venuto. Quando ci salutiamo gli dico che ha la mia e-mail, che mi mandi la fattura del lavoro che gli faccio un bonifico. “Mah, visto che era un prezzo di favore, pensavo che potevamo accordarci tra noi…”, mi dice. “Ah… Eh, non avevo capito che li volessi cash…” Ma dove lo trovo adesso un cazzo bancomat, qua in una stazione che c’ha a malapena due binari? E poi posso ritirare solo 250 euro a botta… “Eh, allora? Come facciamo?” “Eh, non lo so io come facciamo.”

These toughts are born from the clouds of an intense relation between sleep and awake. Click or tap on the images to reveal them.
These toughts are born from the clouds of an intense relation between sleep and awake. Click or tap on the images to reveal them.
sm01we’ve gone from irony and information asymmetry to earnestness and receipts

 

sm02i’ll probably be crucified for saying this but i think woke is the new hipster

 

sm03social media as a democratizing force is more PR than reality

 

sm04wokeness drinks the kool-aid that information is uninflected and transparent

 

sm05instead we get: Poe's Law ? Godwin's Law ? Streisand Effect, rinse, repeat

 

sm06this might be the circulatory system of the outrage machine

 

sm07the optimist gives puts a spiritual spin on political urgency this is an awakening

 

sm08the cynic in me thinks: maybe we’re just awake because the internet never sleeps

sm01 siamo passati da ironia e asimmetria informativa a serietà e scontrini

 

sm02 probabilmente verrò crocifisso per quello che dirò ma penso che lo sveglio sia il nuovo hipster

 

sm03 l’idea dei social media come forza che democratizza è più PR che realtà

 

sm04 l’essere svegli comporta il bersi la storia che l’informazione sia diretta e trasparente

 

sm05 invece abbiamo: la legge di Poe ? la Legge di Godwin ? l’Effetto Streisand, sciacquare, ripetere

 

sm06 questa potrebbe essere la struttura circolare della macchina del fango

 

sm07 l’ottimista mette un accento spirituale sulla urgenza politica – questo è un risveglio

 

sm08 il cinico in me pensa: forse siamo desti solo perché l’internet non dorme mai

Given the nature of this video, we suggest you to wear your headphones while watching it.
Per la natura di questo video, ti invitiamo ad indossare le cuffie durante la visione.
mcassiani-1

 

 

 

mcassiani-2

 

 

 

mcassiani-3

 

 

 

mcassiani-4

 

 

 

mcassiani-5

 

 

 

mcassiani-6

 

 

 

mcassiani-7

 

 

 

mcassiani-8

 

 

 

mcassiani-9

mcassiani-1

 

 

 

mcassiani-2

 

 

 

mcassiani-3

 

 

 

mcassiani-4

 

 

 

mcassiani-5

 

 

 

mcassiani-6

 

 

 

mcassiani-7

 

 

 

mcassiani-8

 

 

 

mcassiani-9

Given the nature of this video, we suggest you to wear your headphones while watching it.
Per la natura di questo video, ti invitiamo ad indossare le cuffie durante la visione.